Iceland supermarket vows to eliminate plastic on all own-branded products!

Click on the words above “Iceland supermarket vows to eliminate plastic…” to see this entire post.

Talk about positive action!

Iceland has become the first major retailer to commit to eliminate plastic packaging for all its own-brand products.

The supermarket chain, which specialises in frozen food, said it would go plastic-free within five years to help end the “scourge” of plastic pollution.

The current plastic packaging would be replaced with paper and pulp trays and paper bags, which would be recyclable through domestic waste collections or in-store recycling facilities.

The supermarket recently carried out a survey in which 80% of 5,000 people polled said they would endorse the move to go plastic-free.

Read the entire story here.

As you can see from what I collected below Slide Ranch on Monday, the US would be wise to follow suit.

The road to get to Slide Ranch directly has been closed for some time and only recently opened to one-way traffic. It has been over 2 years since I have picked up this area.
What you see below is a tiny fraction of what is down there. I was short on time and could only do a quick sweep of a small portion of the beach.

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Slide Ranch and the southern Marin Coast

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Coho salmon return to Lagunitas Creek to spawn

Click on the words above “Coho salmon return to Lagunitas Creek to spawn” to see this entire post.

It rained really hard the past two days, enough to raise the level of local creeks permitting the return of our beloved Coho Salmon to complete the next phase of their journey, spawning.

The following still images show what are likely two very large male salmon jousting to assert dominance in order to determine which of them will spawn with the nearby females.

If you go out to see the salmon, and I strongly encourage you to do so, please observe a few simple suggestions to ensure the fish are not disturbed and you are comfortable.

  • Wear warm clothing with layers, ideally in muted colors to blend in with the greens and browns alongside the creek. Wear rubber boots or sturdy hiking shoes.
  • Bring binoculars, polarized glasses to see through the water from a distance
  • Leave your pets at home, if they must join you, please keep them on a leash
  • Stay on the road, away from the creek. do not go down to the creekside, disturbing the fish
  • Keep your voices down, the fish can hear you.

Be patient as you walk along the creek and you will see the magic of these fish returning to the creek where they likely hatched 3 years ago, to lay eggs, fertilize them, then die.

The best places to easily view spawning coho are the Leo T. Cronin viewing pools in Samuel Taylor Park, Devils Gulch, both on Sir Francis Drake Blvd.

Be sure to wait a day or two after heavy rains to let the silt settle so you can clearly see the fish.

For similar amazing footage of coho spawning on Lagunitas, go here.

Stop the pebble mine in Bristol Bay Alaska – save Alaska’s greatest sockeye salmon run, go here.

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If you have a large screen, click the white rectangle-ish shaped icon to fill your screen with fish.
 
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The Washington Dept. of Ecology completed the final environmental assessment of a proposal to use the pesticide imidacloprid to control burrowing shrimp.

Click on the words above “The Washington Dept. of Ecology completed the final…” to see this entire post.

The supplemental environmental review found:

 

  • Significant impacts to sediment quality and benthic invertebrates.
  • Adverse impacts to juvenile worms and crustaceans in the areas treated with imidacloprid and the nearby areas covered by incoming tides.
  • Concern about non-lethal impacts to invertebrates in the water column and sediment.
  • New information shows a risk of impacts from imidacloprid even at low concentrations.
  • Likely indirect impacts to fish and birds if food sources are disrupted.
  • Little known direct risk to fish, birds, marine mammals, and human health.
  • Increased uncertainty about long-term, non-lethal, and cumulative impacts.
  • Continued knowledge gaps about imidacloprid.

Read more here.

This matters to everyone, not just Washingtonians. Nearly a quarter of the oysters grown in the US are grown in Willapa Bay and Grays Harbor.

These oysters are shipped all over, including to growers on Tomales Bay.

Read more about imidacloprid, the neurotoxin Washington growers want to spray in local waters to kill native shrimp here.

Washington State shellfish growers propose spraying of neurotoxin over coastal bays

Click on the words above “Washington State shellfish growers” to see this entire post.

The banner image above shows the terminals at Grays Harbor.

After watching their promotional video below, you might ask yourself
“What’s in that Grays Harbor water, is it clean enough to grow food for human consumption?”

Watch a public hearing on this issue here. Meeting was held 10 Oct. in Lacey WA, near Olympia.

Watch a public hearing on this issue here. Meeting was held 7 Oct. in South Bend WA, at Willapa Bay.

Shellfish growers from Willapa Grays Harbor Oyster Growers Association (WGHOGA) have requested a permit to use the pesticide imidacloprid on burrowing shrimp in Willapa Bay and Grays Harbor.

You can read more about this here.

Both bodies of water are located on the Washington State coast, SW of Puget Sound.

Shellfish growers in Tomales Bay import oysters grown in Willapa Bay from time to time.

Please comment on the proposed spraying of toxic pesticides, you can do so here< NOTE: COMMENT PERIOD IS CLOSED

Read all comments here.

Read a letter from Washington Fish and Wildlife Office here.

Read a letter from the National Marine Fisheries Service here.

Read a letter from The Northwest Center for Alternatives to Pesticides here.

Let Washington State know that spraying a highly toxic, highly soluble, and highly persistent pesticide in Willapa Bay is unacceptable. Other methods to grow oysters can be used.

Please let Tomales Bay shellfish growers know that you will NOT buy oysters grown by those who poison the ocean.

The poison in question has been directly linked to the widespread deaths of honeybees worldwide, known as Colony Collapse Disorder CCD. Read about that here.

Respecting Tomales Bay – 16 September 2017 is coastal cleanup day – meet at Marconi Center

Help clean up Tomales Bay, then enjoy an oyster BBQ.

Go here to register.

Show up a little early to the activity field at Marconi.

845 am show up
900 am – noon show the bay some love
noon – 200 pm enjoy a bbq oyster feast

More images from the exploration by NautilusLive and crew

Click on the words above “More images from the exploration by NautilusLive and crew” to see this entire post.

Nautilus has returned to port from the exploration of Bodega Canyon and is now headed to Astoria Oregon to study
the Olympic Coast NMS and Quinault Canyon

Here are some more screen captures I recorded while watching live last week.

An amazing adventure.

Click on an image to see a larger version.

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NautilusLive continues to explore Bodega Canyon

Click the above words “NautilusLive explores Bodega Canyon in Cordell Bank…” to see this entire post.

Point your browser here to see live video from ROV’s associated with Nautilus Live.

#nautiluslive
#oceanisblue

Here are some screen grabs from Tuseday night and Wednesday.

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NautilusLive explores Bodega Canyon in Cordell Bank NMS

Click the above words “NautilusLive explores Bodega Canyon in Cordell Bank NMS” to see this entire post.

Point your browser here to see live video from ROV’s associated with Nautilus Live.

#nautiluslive
#oceanisblue

Here are some screen grabs from last night (Monday)

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Coral

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Coral

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Flat nosed fish, coral

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Octopus, coral, sea star and more

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ROV arm sampling coral

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Octopus

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Sea Pigs

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Whale Watching off Bird Rock

Click the words above “Whale Watching off Bird Rock” to see this entire post

A few weeks ago a friend invited me to go out salmon fishing on his boat.

It had been over 40 years since I had last been out salmon fishing, so I was more than a little rusty.

He assured me we’d be fine, as he had been going his entire life.

Earlier in the week the salmon were being caught in great numbers.

This day, we caught one. The 40+ boats around us in the vast expanse of the Eastern Pacific pulled in a few as well.

But, this day was not really about salmon fishing.

Today was a day for whale watching.

We were surrounded by not just any whales either.

Blue whales! Everywhere.

Sometimes so close as they came up for air, the sound of their exhalations startled me as I peered at the fishing poles under tension on the opposite side of the boat.

With our skipper keeping an eye on the rods, and the other man aboard at the helm, I manned the long lens to record what you see below.

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common murres

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Blue whale

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common murre

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Blue whale

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common murre

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Blue whale

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A man truly in his element

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