Amazon buys Twitch

Click on “Amazon buys Twitch” above to see this entire post.

On the radio today I heard a story about a company buying another company.

The company being bought is unique.

The company being bought is named Twitch.

Twitch allows people to watch, on their computer, other people playing video games, on their computer.

Amazon is paying about one billion dollars for a company that allows people to waste time watching other people waste time (most of whom are likely shooting make-believe guns at make believe people).


According to the UN, 783 million people world-wide do not have access to clean water.

The same source estimates 2.5 billion people do not have access to adequate sanitation.

Humans are filling the oceans with trillions of pieces of plastic each and every day, killing hundreds of thousands of animals.

Our unconscious behaviors are destroying our planet.


Surely we can do better.

We must.

Or our children will inherit a toxic planet, devoid of diversity.


I promise not to buy or play a single video game next year.

I promise to pick up litter each and every day next year.

I promise to not buy any drinking water packaged in plastic next year.

I promise to try to get 5 people stop buying bottled water forever next year.

What small thing could you do?

Plastic China, a film by Wang Jiuliang

Click the words above, “Plastic China, a film by Wang Jiuliang” to see this entire post.

This film will have a world premier at the 2017 Sundance Film Festival!

Go here to see the trailer of the day, very exciting.

A little over a month ago I received an email message from a young woman who had seen my image of large meta-bottles on Drakes Beach when she stayed at the Point Reyes Youth Hostel. In her message she explained that a documentary filmmaker and photographer from China would be in the SF Bay Area soon. If I was amenable, and had time, she wondered if I could meet with him.

Last Sunday I met the brother I never knew I had.

Arrangements were made and we thought we might have 3 hours together out in West Marin to look at some of my projects as well as visit areas of interest to Wang.

We, Wang (who speaks little English), his friend Xiao (who speaks English and Mandarin), and myself (whose Mandarin is limited to: thank you, you’re welcome, and check please) spent the entire day together. It was fantastic.

I learned about Wang’s first film, “Beijing, besieged by waste“, see movie trailer here.

Wang is now working on a film titled Plastic China. A film about the harm done to the Chinese people that process the infinite amount of recycled material from the rest of the world, of whom the US is a major contributor.
That ounce of pride we take when we place our plastic bottle, metal can or unwanted electronic waste into the recycle bin is seen in a new light in Wang’s latest film.

See a current trailer for Plastic China here.

Much of the day was spent with me on the other side of the camera being filmed by Wang for his new film. It was more than a little challenging looking towards the camera, but not at the camera. All the while trying to answer questions Wang first asked in Mandarin, then Xiao re-asked in English.

Wang and I hope to continue the dialog we began. Perhaps we can forge a conduit whereby the people of our respective countries gain a greater understanding of each other. Such that we can learn to be kinder to the planet, and to each other.

Both Wang and I are disturbed by what we see the majority of the humans doing to our tiny earth.

Please enjoy these images as you ponder what steps you might be willing to take in order to lighten your burden on our planet…

Great Heron

Great Heron

Beauty ushers forth from between a rock and a hard place. Lewisia is one of my favorite flowers of the sierra. Found up high where few dare visit.

Beauty ushers forth from between a rock and a hard place. Lewisia is one of my favorite flowers of the sierra. Found up high where few dare visit.

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Whose job is it anyhow….?

Click the words above “Whose job is it anyhow….?” to see this entire post.

Can anyone tell me whose job is it to ensure that the mess left by The Drakes Bay Oyster Company gets cleaned up?

I’ve asked people at the California Coastal Commission, Department of Fish & Wildlife and the National Park Service this very question. Twice!

I’ve not heard a peep from anyone, after nearly two weeks.

It seems important to find out whose job it is. In the past, when oyster leases changed hands in West Marin, or operations shut down, big messes get left – see images below.

All those years profits being made, and every time, the earth gets left holding the [grow-out]bag, [polyethylene]tube, [nylon]rope, [PVC]pipe, zip-tie etc….

As always, click on a picture to see a larger version.

Sustainable oyster farming, West Marin style. Click image to see larger version.

Sustainable oyster farming, West Marin style.
Click image to see larger version.


Above is what Charlie Johnson (and now Kevin Lunny) want to gift to the planet.
No thanks, please clean up YOUR mess.

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Oyster farming trash left on the floor of Drakes Estero by Drakes bay Oyster Company

Oyster farming trash left on the floor of Drakes Estero by Drakes bay Oyster Company

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Thousands of feral non-native oysters left growing in Drakes Estero by DBOC

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Some of the hundreds, likely thousands of “french tubes” left to rot on the floor of Drakes Estero by DBOC.

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Some of the hundreds, likely thousands of “french tubes” left to rot on the floor of Drakes Estero by DBOC.

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Some of the hundreds, likely thousands of “french tubes” left to rot on the floor of Drakes Estero by DBOC.

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One string of oysters covered with non-native, invasive tunicate D. vexilium. There are many dozens, possibly hundreds more just like this, left in Drakes Estero by DBOC.

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Above are iron oyster racks, likely from Drew Alden, left in the southern Tomales Bay lease now operated by Todd Friend at TBOC.
No thanks, please clean up YOUR mess.

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abandoned plastic trays - Tomales Bay Oyster Company

abandoned plastic trays – Tomales Bay Oyster Company


Above was left when Drew Alden sold his lease to Todd Friend over 5 years ago.
Why is this mess still disgracing Tomales Bay?

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abandoned grow out bags covered with marine growth - Tomales Bay Oyster Company

abandoned grow out bags covered with marine growth – Tomales Bay Oyster Company


Above was left when Drew Alden sold his lease to Todd Friend over 5 years ago.
Why is this mess still disgracing Tomales Bay?

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Location -  38.128490° N   -122.864172° W   Datum WGS84

Location – 38.128490° N -122.864172° W Datum WGS84


Not sure who so generously left this mess in Tomales Bay.
No thanks, please clean up YOUR mess.

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On the eastern shore of Tomales Bay, north of Walker Creek you’ll find this mess from oyster operations begun and abruptly ended decades ago.
Why is this mess still disgracing Tomales Bay?

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On the eastern shore of Tomales Bay, north of Walker Creek you’ll find this mess from oyster operations begun and abruptly ended decades ago.
Why is this mess still disgracing Tomales Bay?

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RJames.IMG_0787
On the eastern shore of Tomales Bay, north of Walker Creek you’ll find this mess from oyster operations begun and abruptly ended decades ago.
Why is this mess still disgracing Tomales Bay?

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If people want to make an honest buck farming oysters, that is fine by me. It is hard work, no question about that. But, taking shortcuts, short-sighted business practices and just plain arrogance has been trashing the planet.

The disgraceful disaster scattered on the bottom of the thousand acre lease of precious Drakes Estero is at zero to ten feet below sea level usually.

We now have an opportunity to see the stewards of the land, with a deep respect for the waters of Drakes Estero show us just how deep their respect is.

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Sustainable Oyster Farming, West Marin Style – part 5 DBOC trash in Drakes Estero, director’s cut

Click the words above, “Sustainable Oyster Farming, West Marin Style…” to see this entire post.

Due to popular demand, a shorter version of the staggeringly popular seven minute film showing the garbage left behind by the Drakes Bay Oyster Company has been released.

See below for the distilled three minute version.

Be sure to click the rectangle icon in lower right of video window to fill your screen with the image.


See the next post in this series here

Stay outta the ditch…

Click the words above “Stay outta the ditch…” to see this entire post.

Stay outta the ditch is something I often say to cyclists.

Being a cyclist, and having crashed a time or two…..

I try to hug the white line when riding the narrow roads of West Marin.

(I do wish the hoards that invade us each weekend would do the same)

This poor woman, according to the driver behind her as she moved
to a less pleasant part of this fine day, was weaving in and out of the ditch.

The ditch got her.

15 minutes or so after they started peeling this car like a tuna can, she stood up and walked over to the gurney.

As always, click on an image to see a larger version. All images copyright ©Richard James Photography, no use without explicit, written permission. Linking to images with attribution allowed.

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